Current Page: 1 of 2
Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: shendy (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 08:10

"Crippling depression"
[www.coventrytelegraph.net]

Good to see things like this coming out into the open.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Saintsby (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 09:28

+1 Here Shendy across all walks of life the black dog stalks. Get it out in the open, get it talked about, get better! Like all illnesses it is exactly that not a 'weakness' or 'phase' Very best of luck Kearnan in all you do.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 16/05/2019 11:02 by Saintsby.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Wilson Pickett (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 09:46

Good on him. The U.K. is decades behind the US on mental health and awareness.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: herbie85 (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 13:15

Quote:
Wilson Pickett
Good on him. The U.K. is decades behind the US on mental health and awareness.

In what respect? Big statement considering the us health care system and a gulf in who has and who hasn't and subsequently who can get and who can't surely

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Stockers (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 13:33

The lack of a publicly funded, free at the point of delivery, health service is, in itself, a major cause of mental illness in the USA. Imagine if you have a life long chronic condition and you cannot afford regular care or expensive medicines (unlike the UK with its NHS), wouldn't you go mad?

Well done to Kearnan for speaking up. The pressures on top sportsmen/women to maintain elite performance levels must be very difficult for some to cope with.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: shendy (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 13:53

I'm not sure "going mad" is quite the right phrase to use here...

The US has been more open about seeking and being in therapy, for quite a long time - compared to the British "stiff upper lip" attitude. But things are changing.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Wilson Pickett (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 14:36

If you watch US movies dating back to the 70s, they’re often regularly visiting therapists.


It’s seen as a common practice rather than only something weirdo mental people do, which is the U.K. perception (albeit changing)


[www.talkspace.com]



you’re conflating healthcare systems, separate discussion

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Duckonstilts (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 14:44

I think its a reasonable thing to bring up. Yes therapy is common among the middle classes in America but the poor are excluded as its usually not covered by insurance even if you can afford it.

I think its its something the UK needs to work harder on, step one is opening up but step 2 is being able to get help. We need to increase spending a lot here.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Saintsby (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 15:07

Quote:
Shendy
compared to the British "stiff upper lip" attitude.

Test Pilot (Tony Hancock) "where's your stiff upper lip man"? Mechanic Keneth Williams on wing of airborne plane, "Just above my weak wobbly chin" funny and just as daft as the idea/atiitude.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 16/05/2019 18:15 by Saintsby.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Hymenoptera (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 15:07

Ill informed statements. As someone who now lives in the US I can tell you that its nowhere near as bad and I'd take it over the NHS any day.

While people wait 2 or 3 years for surgery in the UK, in the US it'll be done in a matter of weeks.
There are centers of excellence all over the place, being the absolute authority on a particular illness.
Post retirement, which can start at 62 you get medicare, which is mostly state covered.
Therapy is covered by insurance.
Having no NHS drives employment. You need to work to keep your family healthy, no sitting at home sponging benefits.
The financial burden on the individual/family is minimal as long as you have an employer, if you don't, there are Blue Cross type alternatives.
A private system means the offerings to the ill are progressive, latest techniques and drugs.


It may not be a perfect fit, ie the cronically ill, for the vast majority of society its a better fit than the NHS.

Eg my wife waited for 3 years for a hip replacement in the UK, she was using a walking stick and could barely walk anywhere by the time surgery was offered. Even then it was a rudimentary procedure.
With the other hip now done for, from diagnosis to surgery was less than a month, with a choice of procedures. - You can guess which one affected her mental state negatively.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Wilson Pickett (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 16:11

Wilson right again

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Wilson Pickett (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 16:18

In 2004, 27% of Americans had been to a therapist within the last 2 years.... they’re the leader is personal mindfulness as well (led by the likes of Sam Harris etc).

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: OldPete (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 16:36

all very well but how if their mental health is so well cared for did they elect Trump ?

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Wilson Pickett (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 17:52

unlike you to only post about politics


US economy very strong. BAME employment at all times highs. Real wages rising. Solid property market, much less pointless Middle East war/ IS defeated...

US is 70% consumption economy.

On that score he’s top of the class. 52% approval ratings with even millennials.

The rest is media noise, he will get re-elected.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: shiversaint (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 19:31

Quote:
Wilson Pickett
If you watch US movies dating back to the 70s, they’re often regularly visiting therapists.

It’s seen as a common practice rather than only something weirdo mental people do, which is the U.K. perception (albeit changing)


[www.talkspace.com]



you’re conflating healthcare systems, separate discussion

They're open in that therapy is normalised. They are not leagues ahead in efficacy. Quite the opposite and any visit to a major Californian city would tell you that, coupled with the horrifying stats on what their veterans go through. A ridiculous set of statements from you on this one WP.

It's all well and good "talking about depression" but it's next to useless if that's where the buck stops. Awareness is not the same as execution, and the idea of depression being something that people aren't aware of is rooted in a timeframe that's nearly out of living memory. The vast majority know what it is, the vast majority know someone who has experienced it, and probably a decent chunk of us have experienced it ourselves in one way or another. Very few are prepared to do anything to help others recover from it, least of all the US.

Quote:
Hymenoptera
Ill informed statements. As someone who now lives in the US I can tell you that its nowhere near as bad and I'd take it over the NHS any day.
While people wait 2 or 3 years for surgery in the UK, in the US it'll be done in a matter of weeks.
There are centers of excellence all over the place, being the absolute authority on a particular illness.
Post retirement, which can start at 62 you get medicare, which is mostly state covered.
Therapy is covered by insurance.
Having no NHS drives employment. You need to work to keep your family healthy, no sitting at home sponging benefits.
The financial burden on the individual/family is minimal as long as you have an employer, if you don't, there are Blue Cross type alternatives.
A private system means the offerings to the ill are progressive, latest techniques and drugs.


It may not be a perfect fit, ie the cronically ill, for the vast majority of society its a better fit than the NHS.

Eg my wife waited for 3 years for a hip replacement in the UK, she was using a walking stick and could barely walk anywhere by the time surgery was offered. Even then it was a rudimentary procedure.
With the other hip now done for, from diagnosis to surgery was less than a month, with a choice of procedures. - You can guess which one affected her mental state negatively.

There's a lot of assumptions there which read as if written by someone who's never had an issue affording healthcare here in the US.

My family are on a great plan, and I commit about $8000 a year for that. On a substantial wage, it's no great shakes to achieve. If you're anywhere closer to the median U.S. salary, you're either putting close to 30% of your income into healthcare, or you take a more affordable plan which offers less benefits. Invariably the latter happens. It then doesn't take a lot to happen to have your life utterly ruined in that situation. If you don't happen to have decent coverage through your employer, and it certainly is not a given, it can be really, really difficult.

The U.S. system is appalling for catastrophic events that happen to the people who border the lower and middle class, which is a majority of the population. You statement on the majority is just not true. It works great for those in the top 10% and there are acceptable safety nets for those at the bottom of society. It's a gulf in between.

Also, who waits 3 years for surgery on the NHS?

For the record, I've consumed NHS services at quite serious levels multiple times, and wouldn't complain once. I think it does a much better job of dealing with the majority of society. U.S. healthcare is certainly better quality at the upper end, but with the money involved, that's no surprise. The size of the economy and population pretty much predicates that a majority of leading services would reside in the U.S. It'd be strange if it wasn't that way.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Corkst (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 21:57

Quote:
Hymenoptera
Ill informed statements. As someone who now lives in the US I can tell you that its nowhere near as bad and I'd take it over the NHS any day.
While people wait 2 or 3 years for surgery in the UK, in the US it'll be done in a matter of weeks.
There are centers of excellence all over the place, being the absolute authority on a particular illness.
Post retirement, which can start at 62 you get medicare, which is mostly state covered.
Therapy is covered by insurance.
Having no NHS drives employment. You need to work to keep your family healthy, no sitting at home sponging benefits.
The financial burden on the individual/family is minimal as long as you have an employer, if you don't, there are Blue Cross type alternatives.
A private system means the offerings to the ill are progressive, latest techniques and drugs.


It may not be a perfect fit, ie the cronically ill, for the vast majority of society its a better fit than the NHS.

Eg my wife waited for 3 years for a hip replacement in the UK, she was using a walking stick and could barely walk anywhere by the time surgery was offered. Even then it was a rudimentary procedure.
With the other hip now done for, from diagnosis to surgery was less than a month, with a choice of procedures. - You can guess which one affected her mental state negatively.

Who is paying for your health insurance and how much is it costing?
I'd say you're the ill informed one here. Vast majority - don't make me laugh.

WP, do you judge a country based on films and tv shows?
And even if you did take those as being representative have you not noticed that it's highly paid people going to those therapists.

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Corkst (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 22:16

Quote:
Wilson Pickett
In 2004, 27% of Americans had been to a therapist within the last 2 years.... they’re the leader is personal mindfulness as well (led by the likes of Sam Harris etc).

What's your source?

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Corkst (IP Logged)
Date: 16 May, 2019 22:18

Quote:
Wilson Pickett
If you watch US movies dating back to the 70s, they’re often regularly visiting therapists.

It’s seen as a common practice rather than only something weirdo mental people do, which is the U.K. perception (albeit changing)


[www.talkspace.com]



you’re conflating healthcare systems, separate discussion

Your link is to an article written by a bloke who is normally a film reviewer.
Just saying...

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Wilson Pickett (IP Logged)
Date: 17 May, 2019 09:03

If people aren’t getting treatment, there is no efficacy

the reason I mention the movies as a point of reference is because they generally reflect societal norms at that point in time.


Fill your boots



[www.google.co.uk]

Re: Interesting article on Kearnan Myall's retirement
Posted by: Wilson Pickett (IP Logged)
Date: 17 May, 2019 09:17

CorkSt


feel free in any threads to actually add some content instead of solely trying to denigrate others, it’s tiresome

Current Page: 1 of 2
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
We record all IP addresses on the Sportnetwork message boards which may be required by the authorities in case of defamatory or abusive comment. We seek to monitor the Message Boards at regular intervals. We do not associate Sportnetwork with any of the comments and do not take responsibility for any statements or opinions expressed on the Message Boards. If you have any cause for concern over any material posted here please let us know as soon as possible by e-mailing abuse@sportnetwork.net